So, you’re getting ready for a big show performance at a Greek event and you’ve found this incredible Greek song to dance to. You practice for weeks, you get it all together and the day comes for you to perform. You don’t understand why people are shaking their heads, or leaving or don’t seem happy with your show. Afterwards, your client lets ¬†you know that they were disappointed in your song choices. Or, worst of all, they stop your performance by cutting off your music and escort you from the stage.


THIS IS WHY TRANSLATION IS IMPORTANT.


Here are a few scenarios:


1. You chose the Greek national anthem to perform to with a sword (I have heard of this actually happening) not only is it not appropriate to perform to the national anthem but with a sword? When the anthem specifically has a section about the freedom being won by the bones?


2. Your pop song had numerous bad words and sexually suggestive phrases in it that were not audience appropriate. This is especially important to pay attention to in a mixed audience. It could offend the older generation or parents don’t want their small children to hear bad words.


3. Lastly, you bellydanced to a song that was clearly a folk line dance song. If the song has the same beats as a pop song or if you infuse some of the folk step into your performance, then they will let it slide. But if it’s a Krytiko Syrto (The song Miserlou is a prime example of this) and you’re rocking your veil to it and your feet don’t once stop to do that step… well….


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All of this could have been avoided if you had asked for a translation. The translation that I provide for clients not only provides the Greek to English wording but also cultural intonations. I will let you know if a song isn’t appropriate or if it is to a line dance and the like. As much as you want to make your clients happy, I want my culture to be represented appropriately, as well as bellydance.


I WANT dancers to use Greek music. I would love to go to a show and hear a Greek song during a dancer’s performance, as long as they give it the same respect that they would Egyptian, lebanese, Turkish, etc, music. So please please, contact me and let me help you out!